Organization

Story
21 June 2012

With the release of applications for the new gTLD process, we asked a number of industry experts for their views of what the information shows.


Lesley Cowley

CEO, Nominet

Overall feelings?
There were more applications than I had expected when things first kicked off years ago. In the run up to the reveal, the predictions (or leaks) were pretty accurate. But there are now just shy of 2,000 applications in the mix, so it’s safe to say not all of the new gTLDs will be successful.

The sheer volume of applications means that, due to conflicts, many of the bids will not make it through the starting gate.

Inevitably, the volume also means there are applications whose merits are less obvious than others. ICANN of course must be neutral about the ‘content’ of the applications. Many of the bids under application – like dot-bbc, which we are involved with - make sense.

Story
21 June 2012

With the release of applications for the new gTLD process, we asked a number of industry experts for their views of what the information shows.


Alexa Raad

CEO, Architelos

What is your overall feeling about the applications?
Overall, a lot more brands than many of the pundits would have led one to believe,especially, the ANA. I suspect some did apply for a closed Brand gTLD, but may soon find out that applying for a TLD and protecting second level domains names are not one and the same thing. That sadly is due to the lack of awareness and education as well as the steadfast refusal of organizations such as the ANA to adequately and fairly educate their stakeholders.

Story
21 June 2012

With the release of applications for the new gTLD process, we asked a number of industry experts for their views of what the information shows.


Michael Berkens

Director, RightoftheDot.com

What is your overall feeling about the applications?
Well I think it was as interesting to see who applied as who did not apply.

Google i think shocked everyone applying for so many generic TLDs, Donuts shocked the world by applying for over 300 after talking about applying for 10.

It was good to see domainers among the applicants including Frank Schilling, the Directi group and Daniel Negari.

I was equally surprised to see Apple not applying for dot-app especially in light of the fact that they have been in litigation over the trademark for App Store with Amazon for quite a while or dot-mac which was could have been applied for by the cosmetic company and therefore lost.

I was also surprised not to see an application from eBay, Facebook and Twitter who have millions of active members.

Story
21 June 2012

With the release of applications for the new gTLD process, we asked a number of industry experts for their views of what the information shows.


John Berard

CEO, Voxpopuliregistry.com

What is your overall feeling about the applications?
I was impressed with the mix of applicants. Some came from branded companies, some from long-time domain industry players and still others from entrepreneurs who see the possibilities inherent in the expansion of the Internet landscape. I feel very good that each one projects a credible business proposition.

What are you most surprised by?
How tightly the opportunity clearly was embraced by marketing executives. The applications show that Fiat wants to create a global fleet of dot-abarth, Chanel hopes to make the Internet more alluring with dot-chanel, Bridgestone wants to improve its mileage by installing dot-firestone and Dot Vegas wants everything to stay in dot-vegas.

What are you most excited about?

Story
21 June 2012

With the release of applications for the new gTLD process, we asked a number of industry experts for their views of what the information shows.


James Bladel

Director of Policy Planning, GoDaddy

Before ICANN opened the new gTLD application process, Go Daddy CEO Warren Adelman cautioned ICANN to take the time to carefully launch new gTLDs. We've already seen a few bumps along the way, like the TAS 'glitch.'

On the Internet, most people still think of dot-com as the extension for websites. It will be interesting to see which new gTLD extensions gain traction with the public. As has been our practice, we will look to our customers to tell us what they want when it comes to deciding which new gTLDs Go Daddy should offer.


Story
21 June 2012

With the release of applications for the new gTLD process, we asked a number of industry experts for their views of what the information shows.


Gavin Brown

CTO, CentralNic

The Big Reveal Day has come and gone, and seemed strangely anti-climactic for me as I sat in the crowded conference room in London waiting for the list to be made public.

I’ve spent the last couple of years writing RFP responses and application material, meeting clients, and seeing CentralNic’s projected applications list double, and then double again (to a total of 60), all the while having to keep quiet about who we were working with. Once that all-important list entered the public domain, it was actually quite difficult to switch modes and be a bit more open about who our clients were.

Story
21 June 2012
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After years of playing the coy .virgin, waiting for the right moment to say yes, the excitement of ICANN's potential suitors is writ large in their .love letters posted in that most unreliable of matchmakers, the TLD Application System (Is that an 18-letter long string in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me working again?)

Not all suitors will be rewarded, and none will get their $185,000 engagement rings back, so it's only fair to award applicants for efforts to stand out in a very crowded room.

In London within a few weeks there's a big sporting event whose name cannot be mentioned in the context of gTLDs. So, taking inspiration from the only successful thing Greece currently can claim credit for (and they need plenty of credit), here are...


The Definitely Not The Oly*pics gTLD Awards


Sympathy award for applicants whose exec team had 'good ideas' for top level domains

Purely a demonstration sport, so no medals, but a tie between:

.americanexpress (15 characters)

.allfinanzberater (16 characters)

Story
20 June 2012

Applications for new Internet extensions make it clear that change is coming, albeit wrapped in the Stars & Stripes


The Internet of tomorrow is here, US-style

At the launch of hundreds of new extensions to the Internet last week, the head of the organization overseeing the process was embarrassed when an audience member pointed out that all the Arabic names appearing on a screen behind him were written backwards.

The CEO, an American, immediately apologized. As did his head of communications, also American. She further pointed out that the incorrect names had been noticed before the event but there hadn't been time to change them, so they went ahead with the wrong versions.

As analogies go, this exchange describes perfectly the seven-year process to create new generic top-level domains, and its end results. With the information finally published, it seems that this is to be a very American revolution.

Story
13 June 2012
Premium content

Predictions, new companies and - finally - the release of information

With just a few hours to go until details of the thousands of applications for new Internet domains is finally released, those that have spent the past five years working up to this day are, tentatively, allowing themselves to get excited.

The process run by ICANN has been one of the more convoluted, painful and at times, downright frustrating experiences that many of the companies in the Internet field have ever experienced. But tomorrow at least everyone will be able to revel in the fact that it has finally happened.

ICANN, and particularly its outgoing CEO, is trying to make as much of the launch as possible. Sadly, the right of ICANN to be excited and proud was lost some time ago - somewhere between the fourth version of the Applicant Guidebook and the six-week delay in closing applications.

Story
12 June 2012
Premium content

No let up in vocal skirmishes as summary document leaks


ITR discussions begin to resemble Monty Python's argument sketch

It is an unsettling truth that if you are being physically attacked, experts recommend you should shout the word "fire" rather than "help".

Why? Because if people hear the word "fire" they immediate think it could affect them too, so you get their attention. Once you have it, people find it much harder not to rush to your aid.

It is difficult to picture the United States government in the role of victim, but even so it has been on a concerted and organized campaign to shout the word "fire" as frequently and loudly as possible in recent months over an upcoming conference in Dubai in December. The Internet is being attacked by the United Nations, come the cries, and if you don't help, you can kiss goodbye to the network you know and love.

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